Friday RoundUp For August 29th, 2014

Here are some of the posts that I have enjoyed from other people’s blogs this week:

 

Nate Martin  –  Scared of Seminary

Tomorrow marks my first day as a seminary student at the Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary in Wake Forest, N.C. I am thrilled of course, but I would be lying if I didn’t say I was scared. I am scared because I am about to get exactly what I asked for and it makes me very uncomfortable. Let me explain… CLICK HERE TO READ MORE

 

J.D. Greear-  What David Platt’s IMB Presidency Signals About Our Future:

This morning, the International Mission Board (IMB) trustees announced David Platt as the new IMB President. I have no doubts that he is God’s man, chosen for this task in this hour. Personally, I could not be more thrilled. I think this is a wonderful gift of God to our Convention of churches….CLICK HERE TO READ MORE

 

Josh Patterson –  4 Leadership Lessons From Nehemiah

Leadership tends to define itself better in person than on a page. In recent decades leadership has vaulted to the forefront of organizational discussion, classroom research and publishing houses across the world. Books on the topic abound. In their work, “Classical Leadership,” Michelle Doyle and Mark Smith write, “What is leadership? It seems to be one of those qualities that you know when you see it, but is difficult to describe. There are almost as many definitions as there are commentators.” CLICK HERE TO READ MORE

 

Thabiti Anyabwile-   Is It “Goodbye Evangelicalism” or “We Evangelicals Join in Your Suffering”?

When James Cone wrote A Black Theology of Liberation in the late 1960s, he was attempting to provide a theological framework for understanding and guiding the feelings and actions of African-American protestors. He wrote in the wake of a deadly riot in Detroit. He felt a burden, a heavy weight to say something meaningful as a Christian. He felt, as many had before him, that if Christianity had no answer for Black people caught in the roiling cauldron of Jim Crow segregation and state-sponsored terrorism then Christianity had no credibility whatsoever. CLICK HERE TO READ MORE

 

Ronnie Floyd The Prayer Life of A Pastor

Prayer is built on the Word of God. This prevents us from getting out of balance or off into theological error. Sometimes people think those who practice prayer are intellectual midgets or theologically inferior. Great prayer warriors base their praying on God’s Word, the surest truth in this world. CLICK HERE TO READ MORE

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The Importance of Praying Together

Christ Church StellartonWe have experienced something very special over the past several weeks here at First Baptist, Metropolis.  For nearly two months now God has moved within our congregation in a very special way.  Last Sunday night in our deacons meeting we rejoiced in the fact that last month eighteen people joined our fellowship, most of them by baptism.  What’s even more exciting is that nearly every week, I am hearing from other Pastors around the country about how God is moving in their congregations.  Couple that with the fact that right not across the nation there are two films in the theaters that expressly present the gospel (Son of God and God is not Dead) and it becomes clear that something special is beginning to happen.  While it is too early to call it revival, God is clearly up to something and if you pay attention you will see Him moving all around you.  With this in mind, I want to encourage everyone who reads this to refocus and rededicate themselves to the work of prayer.

It is no secret that every revival in the history of the church has begun with people setting aside time to pray and to seek God’s face.  We are all familiar with 2 Chronicles 7:14 which says, “If my people who are called by my name humble themselves, and pray and seek my face and turn from their wicked ways, then I will hear from heaven and will forgive their sin and heal their land.”  Notice the emphasis here on prayer and repentance.  These are the two key elements in every great revival that has occurred in the church.  Therefore, over the next couple of weeks, I am going to dedicate this blog space to encouraging and equipping Christians for the work of prayer.

1 Thessalonians 5:16-18 says, “Rejoice always, pray without ceasing, give thanks in all circumstances; for this is the will of God in Christ Jesus for you.”  One of the first things that stands out in these verses is that these commands are to be the perpetual activity of Christians.  We should always be rejoicing, always praying, and always giving thanks.  Many years ago, I had the opportunity to serve with an older Pastor named Tom Darter.  One of the interesting characteristics of Tom’s personality was that when he started to pray he would begin with the word “…and.”  So if you were sitting down to a meal with Tom he would pray, “…and Father we thank you for this food.”  If you asked him to pray for a need he would say, “…and Father I come to you today on behalf of Joe…”  If he was praying in the worship service he would say, “…and Father we praise you today for…”  He always began his prayers with the word “…and.”  One day I worked up the courage to ask Tom why he did this.  I will never forget what he said, “Joe, prayer is the continuous work of every Christian.  Our prayers do not have a beginning and an end, our lives are just one continuous prayer.”  Tom went on to explain that when he prayed he was just continuing an ongoing conversation with God that had begun at the moment of his conversion.

This is what Paul has in mind here when he says “pray without ceasing.”  We should be in an ongoing conversation with God that reflects our gratitude, our dependence, and our adoration.  Today, as you go through your daily schedule I hope that you will strive to keep up a constant conversation with God.  As you go through your day, talk to Him.  Praise Him for His goodness and grace.  Ask Him for the things you need.  Thank Him for the many blessings, even the small ones, that He sends your way.  Pray without ceasing.